Green Cards

Immigrant visas allow foreign nationals to live and work in the U.S. permanently. Upon completion of all requirements for Permanent Residency, foreign nationals are issued a Lawful Permanent Resident Card, also known as a "Green Card." Green Card is an unofficial term for the  Permanent Resident Card and is an identification card that verifies that the holder is a permanent resident of the U.S. and is allowed to live and work in the U.S. legally. The most common ways foreign nationals acquire Permanent Residency in the United States are through either employment-based immigrant petitions or family-based immigrant petitions. Less common ways foreign nationals can acquire a green card is through investment, adoption, asylum, or being self-sponsored.

To acquire Legal Permanent Residency based on employment, an employer must file a labor certification application with the Department of Labor (DOL). An approved labor certification issued by the DOL is a prerequisite to start an employment-based Immigrant visa petition process with the USCIS. For more information, please click here.

To acquire Legal Permanent Residency based on family relationship, a foreign national must have a U.S. citizen or Legal Permanent Resident (green card holder) relative who is willing to sponsor them for their permanent residency by filing an immigrant visa petition (I-130) with the USCIS. It is worth mentioning here that in certain circumstances an immediate relative immigrant visa petition can be filed with the U.S. consulate overseas.  For more information, please click here.

To acquire Legal Permanent Residency based on investment, a foreign national must invest one million dollars either in a new commercial business or in an existing business in the United States. The business must directly or indirectly create at least ten permanent full-time jobs for U.S. workers and the foreign national must be actively engaged in the business. For more information, please click here.

Acquiring Legal Permanent Residency based on adoption requires adoptive parents to follow certain international treaties and procedures which vary depending on whether or not the child’s birth country is part of the Hague Adoption Convention. Children can be adopted from countries that are not part of the Hague Adoption Convention; however there is a different procedure for those situations. For more information, please click here.

A foreign national who is physically present in the United States may be eligible to apply for Asylum if they can establish that they cannot return to their homeland either because of past persecution or a well founded fear of persecution based on race, religion, ethnicity, political opinion, or membership in a particular group. At least one year after being granted asylum in the U.S., the foreign national may submit an Adjustment of Status application to become a Legal Permanent Resident. For more information, please click here.

To be self-sponsored for Legal Permanent Residency, a foreign national must fall into one of two categories: victims of crime or individuals of extraordinary ability. For more information, please click here.

At The Ahluwalia Firm, our emphasis is on:

•    providing zealous representation before the USCIS
•    providing careful review of your personal circumstances
•    providing careful coordination of all correspondence with government agencies
•    ensuring a service-delivery model that meets and exceeds your satisfaction

For additional information about our ability to help, prepare, and file all the necessary documents required to apply for an Immigrant Visa Petition (green card), please contact our Immigration Attorneys for reliable advice.